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Who Should (and Shouldn’t) Open a Chase Business Complete Checking Account?

The account's features can be a great fit for some business owners but a detriment to others.

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A business checking account is crucial for both new and seasoned business owners alike. If you’ve been using your personal account, or if you’re unsatisfied with your current business account and looking to make a switch, it’s important to shop around and compare multiple options before making a decision.

One of the many accounts to consider is the Chase Business Complete CheckingSM account. The account offers a lot of value to business owners with certain needs, but it’s not necessarily the best fit for everyone. Here’s how the features of the account break down and who should — and shouldn’t — consider applying.

Offer Details
chase business logo effective october 2021

Secure application on issuer’s website.

Bonus: $300 for New Accounts
Monthly Fees: $15 monthly service fee with options to waive
Minimum Opening Balance: None
Features:
Same-day deposits using its QuickAccept service
Unlimited monthly electronic deposits, ACH deposits, and Chase QuickDeposits
Access to 16,000 ATMs and more than 4,700 branches
Process debit card and credit card purchases through the Chase Mobile app
Mobile deposits and account management
FDIC insured

Chase Business Complete Checking: Main Benefits and Features

The Chase Business Complete Checking account offers various features that can help you grow your business, but there are some limitations that could impact certain businesses more than others. Here’s a breakdown of the account features and fees.

Bonus

Not all business checking accounts offer a welcome bonus to new account holders, so the Chase Business Complete Checking account is worth considering, even if you just want to try it out for a year or so. 

As a new customer, you’ll earn $300 when you meet the following criteria:

  • Open a new Chase Business Checking account.
  • Deposit a total of $2,000 in new-to-Chase money into the account within 30 days from account opening.
  • Maintain that $2,000 balance for at least 60 days from account opening. 
  • Make at least five qualifying transactions within 90 days from account opening, including debit card purchases, Chase QuickAccept deposits, Chase QuickDeposit, ACH credits, wire transfers (incoming and outgoing) or bill pay.

After you complete all of these qualifying activities, you’ll receive the bonus as a deposit to your account within 15 days. Keep in mind, though, that you need to open the account online or in-branch with an offer code by February 16, 2023, and if you close the account within six months of opening it, Chase will take the bonus back.

Features

  • Unlimited debit card purchases and Chase ATM transactions.
  • Up to $5,000 in no-fee cash deposits each statement cycle.
  • Associate debit cards and employee deposit cards available upon request.
  • Ability to accept credit card payments with Chase QuickAccept, which has no hidden fees or monthly contract and offers fee-free same-day deposits.
  • Fraud protection services, including check monitoring and approval, payment limits and alerts.

Fees

The account charges a $15 monthly service fee, but Chase offers five different ways to get it waived, including:

  • Maintain a $2,000 minimum daily balance.
  • Make $2,000 in monthly net purchases on one of the Chase Ink business credit cards.
  • Receive $2,000 in monthly deposits via Chase QuickAccept or other eligible Chase Payment Solutions transactions.
  • Link a Chase Private Client Checking account.
  • Provide qualifying proof of military status.

Who Should Open a Chase Business Complete Checking Account?

using credit card at a business
Unsplash

This standard business checking account can be a valuable asset to certain business owners, particularly if your situation or needs mesh well with the features and fee waiver options. Here are some business owners who could benefit:

  • You want a sign-up bonus: It’s not easy earning the account’s $300 bonus, but if your business is relatively new and you could use some extra cash, this account can help. Just make sure you read the fine print, so you understand the terms.
  • Your business accepts credit card payments: Credit card payment solutions can be expensive, and while Chase QuickAccept isn’t free — you’ll pay 2.6% plus $0.10 for mobile card reader transactions and 3.5% plus $0.10 for manual transactions through your mobile app or online banking —  you don’t have to pay extra fees to get same-day deposits or deal with a contract.
  • You have a lot of transactions: Some business checking accounts limit how many free transactions you get, after which you have to pay per “item.” With this one, you can do as many debit card and Chase ATM transactions as you want.
  • You can easily get the monthly fee waived: No one wants to pay a monthly fee for their checking account, and, fortunately, Chase offers several opportunities to get this one waived. If you think you can easily drop the fee down to $0 every month based on the qualifying criteria, you won’t have to worry about the benefits outweighing the costs.

Who Shouldn’t Open a Chase Business Complete Checking Account?

While the account can be a great fit for some business owners, that’s not the case for everyone. Here are some situations where it might not make sense to open the account:

  • You have a lot of cash transactions: If your business works mostly with cash and expects to exceed the $5,000 fee-free limit, or you anticipate that you will relatively soon, you may want to do some more research to find an account that will accommodate your needs without additional fees.
  • You can’t meet the bonus requirements: If keeping $2,000 locked up in the account for 60 days would be a detriment to your business, it’s likely not worth the $300 bonus.
  • You won’t be able to get the monthly fee waived: If your business isn’t set up in a way to make it easy to get the service fee waived every single month, you may want to consider a business checking account that doesn’t charge a fee at all.

The Bottom Line

The Chase Business Complete Checking account can provide some solid value to business owners who have a lot of debit and ATM transactions, accept credit card payments and can make use of its upfront bonus.

On the other hand, if your business handles a lot of cash every month or you’re still a relatively new business and don’t have the volume required to earn the bonus or get the monthly fee waived, you may want to check out some of the other top small business checking accounts out there. 

While we work hard on our research, we do not always provide a complete listing of all available offers from credit-card companies and banks. And because offers can change, we cannot guarantee that our information will always be up to date, so we encourage you to verify all the terms and conditions of any financial product before you apply.

Ben Luthi
Ben Luthi
Ben Luthi is a personal finance and travel writer and credit card expert. He has a degree in finance from Brigham Young University and worked in financial planning, banking and auto finance before writing full-time for NerdWallet and Student Loan Hero. Ben is now a full-time freelance writer and enjoys traveling and spending time with his two kids. His work has appeared in several publications, including U.S. News & World Report, USA Today, Money, Success and Slickdeals.

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